Special Collections and Archives

Eve S. Rosahn, Personal Narrative

Special Collections and Archives

Eve S. Rosahn, Personal Narrative

Eve S. Rosahn, Personal Narrative

Submitted via email, April 25, 2000


In 1970 I was part of a NYC organization called the December 4th Movement (D4M), which was organizing support for the New York Panther 21 (ultimately acquitted after a lengthy trial charging them with conspiracy etc.) D4M was focused on forcing specific institutions in NYC to offer bail or other monetary support as reparations for the exploitation of Black people. I was at Columbia University (the District Attorney prosecuting the Panther 21 -- Frank Hogan -- was a Columbia trustee), and Columbia had gotten an injunction against any type of demonstrations on campus -- which we, of course, broke immediately. On May 5, a number of us were in court, having been arrested for contempt of court for breaking the injunction. I can remember that the CU attorneys, from a giant corporate firm, walked into court expecting we would all get a serious fine and some jail time. The judge could only shake his head and say "they're killing our children," as he let us off with $100 fines!